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Chesapeake Energy contracts Tervita for water treatment services in Utica shale

7 December 2012

Tervita will provide water treatment technologies to remove hydrocarbons, and suspended solids from produced and tophole drilling water in Utica shale

Chesapeake Energy has awarded a contract to Tervita to treat produced and tophole drilling water in its Utica shale production facility.

Tervita's water treatment services will be used to recycle and reuse the vital resource in Chesapeake's operations, as part of its Aqua Renew programme.

As per the contract, Tervita will set up a water treatment facility in Carroll County, Ohio, US, with an option for mobile water treatment technology.

Tervita will use its hybrid water recycling technology to remove hydrocarbons and suspended solids from tophole drilling water, produced water and well pad rain water.

If required, the company will also provide services to remove hardness in water, well site sludge and for ponds treatment.

In addition, Tervita may also remove unwanted suspended solids from the flowback and produced water by using its mobile processing system to treat water.

Tervita US president Phil Vogel said the contract involves recycling and reusing water in the Utica shale.

"Tervita's water treatment capabilities and technologies, paired with our integrated service offerings, are invaluable to our customers as they continue to put more effort into responsible and sustainable resource development," Vogel added.

Chesapeake Energy Utica district manager Tim Dugan said, "Tervita's treatment process will provide clean water and decrease our process costs which will increase our efficiency with reusing water."

Chesapeake will use Tervita Dioxi-Treat and Tervita Dioxi-Green (Cl02) to manage various challenges with oilfield waters that require treatment prior to reuse.


Image: Tervita will provide water treatment technologies to remove suspended solids from produced and tophole drilling water in the Utica shale. Photo: US NARA.