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Brazilian water utility Copasa approves waterworks investment plan for 2013

21 January 2013

Copasa has approved a water investment plan for 2013 to undertake water works in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil

The board of Copasa, a state water utility in the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais, has approved an investment plan of BRL$1.05bn ($515m) to undertake waterworks in the region during 2013.

Under the investment plan, the board has allotted BRL900m ($441m) for the water utility to undertake and complete various water related works and has reserved BRL150m ($73.5m) for its subsidiary Copanor to carry out other related waterworks.

Copanor covers the northern and the north-eastern areas of the Minas Gerais.

The board has also committed BRL880,000 ($431,330) towards another subsidiary, Copasa Águas Minerais de Minas, which is responsible for providing clean, drinkable water for the Araxá, Cambuquira, Caxambu, and Lambari municipalities.

Copasa will transfer the allocated funds to the respective utilities through the state government, reported Business News Americas.

In addition, the board of Copasa has sanctioned two tenders worth BRL19.2 ($9.4m), related to waterworks together in the state.

The project under the first tender, valued at BRL12.2m ($5.9), involves improving, expanding, and maintaining the sewerage system in the eastern region of the state capital Belo Horizonte.

In addition, the project also includes work on collector and interceptor pipelines of up to 15.7in and other sewer connections, as well as topographical, geotechnical and backhoe services.

The work is expected to be completed within 20 months.

The second sanctioned tender, which involves investment worth BRL7.1m ($3.4m) for the south-eastern area of the Belo Horizonte, will include similar work to the first tender.

The 20 month project also includes development studies and the drafting of a basic plan.


Image: Copasa has approved a water investment plan for 2013 to undertake water works in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Photo: Jonathan Wilkins.