September's top stories: San Antonio’s $3.4bn pipeline, KWA to use IBM analytics

Officials from San Antonio Water System (SAWS) presented a draft purchase contract to the city community for purchasing the non-Edwards water supply for the US city, UK-based Arup launched a study along with New South Wales Government-owned Sydney Water, visualising future scenarios of urban water management in cities of Australia and worldwide, while Nanyang Technological University (NTU) start-up Nano Sun in Singapore developed a multifunction water filtration membrane. Water-technology wraps-up the key headlines from September 2014.


Membrane

San Antonio Water finalises draft to bring water through $3.4bn pipeline

San AntonioOfficials from San Antonio Water System (SAWS) presented a draft purchase contract to the city community for purchasing the non-Edwards water supply for the US city.

Under the plan, San Antonio Water plans to build a $3.4bn pipeline from western Burleson County to San Antonio, in order to supply up to 50,000 acre-feet of water to serve 175,000 homes.

Water will be pumped from the Carrizo and Simsboro Aquifers in Burleson County, helping San Antonio Water to reduce dependence on the Edwards Aquifer.

US water utility sector supports $524bn and 289,000 jobs for economy says report

Water, wastewater and storm water utilities will contribute approximately $524bn to the US economy over the next decade, revealed an executive report by the Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) and the Water Research Foundation (WRF).

The report, 'National Economic and Labor Impacts of the Water Utility Sector' (WRF research project #4566), found that the investment on water utilities generates similar jobs to investment in clean energy, transportation and healthcare.

The study was based on planned operating and capital investments of 30 public water utilities and revealed that the sector will create 289,000 permanent jobs over the next ten years.

Arup and Sydney Waters release study on future urban water management

Arup WaterUK-based Arup launched a study along with New South Wales Government-owned Sydney Water, visualising future scenarios of urban water management in cities of Australia and worldwide.

The study assesses the key challenges in supply of safe, secure and sustainable drinking water in urban areas. It delves into possible problems that could affect water supply globally after 25 years, due to population explosion, scarcity of water and recurring budget pressures.

The study, titled 'The future of urban water: scenarios for urban water utilities in 2040', highlights more than 100 social, economic, environmental, political and technology trends that affect global water management.

Namibia Government plans to buy Trekkopje desalination plant from Areva

The Namibian Government is considering buying Areva's seawater desalination plant at Trekkopje, which was built with $271m, to supply water to the country's semi-arid Erongo region.

The seawater reverse osmosis plant was inaugurated in January 2010 to supply water for Areva's Trekkopje uranium project, which was later postponed due to low uranium prices.

Namibia Ministry of Agriculture, Water and Forestry Permanent Secretary Joseph Iita was quoted by Bloomberg as saying: "Cabinet has made a decision for us to acquire that plant; we are busy with technicalities before we make an offer."

The government is planning to buy the plant instead of setting a separate plant.

Indian city to use IBM analytics solution to improve water management

TrivendrumKerala Water Authority (KWA) in India will use advanced analytics and mobility solutions from IBM for analysing, monitoring and managing water distribution in Thiruvananthapuram city.

Kerala Water aims to ensure equitable water distribution in the city by monitoring and fixing irregularities in water use through sensors and intelligent meters.

Equitable supply of water in Thiruvananthapuram is a challenge for KWA, and water distribution centres in the city face losses with almost 45% fresh water unaccounted for or wasted due to leakage.

Fuji Pigment develops silicate iron-based coagulant for water treatment

Japanese company Fuji Pigment developed an environmentally friendly coagulant called FUJI SP PSI for treatment of drinking water.

FUJI SP PSI, invented by Dr Ryohei Mori at Fuji Pigment, is said to cast less environmental impact on earth, plant, animal and human health.

Compared with the conventional coagulant based on poly aluminium chloride (PAC), FUJI SP PSI is based on poly silicate iron (PSI) to make it environmentally friendly, as it is made of safe and abundant elements, iron and silicon.

Singapore researchers develop multifunction water filtration membrane

MembraneNanyang Technological University (NTU) start-up Nano Sun in Singapore developed a multifunction water filtration membrane, which is claimed to be cost-effective while offering better performance.

The new membrane is claimed to have anti-bacterial and anti-biofouling properties, and last twice as long as conventional membranes, while also resistant to breakage.

Researchers also claim that the new membrane can have a flow rate ten times faster than conventional membranes.

Standard set for first American drinking water systems

American National Standards Institute (ANSI) recognised WQA/ASPE/ANSI S-803: Sustainable Drinking Water Treatment Systems as an American National Standard, which is claimed to help consumers select drinking water filters.

WQA/ASPE/ANSI S-803 is the first approved sustainability standard in the country for drinking water treatment products.

S-803 was being used as a private standard by the drinking water treatment industry for more than a year before it received official recognition.